What countries celebrate Lunar New Year?

Spread the love

Countries that regard the first day of the first month of the lunar calendar as a statutory public holiday include:

Most of the following do not include the number of days for flexible adjustment and vacation (the actual integration situation varies from year to year)

  • Vietnam Tết Nguyên Đán: 6-day holiday, from New Year’s Eve to the fifth day of the first month (fixed holiday)
  • South Korea 설날: 3-day holiday, from the first day to the third day of the first month (plus flexible spelling)
  • Singapore Chinese New Year: 2 days off, the first day to the second day of the first month
  • Malaysia Tahun Baru Cina: 2 days off, from the first day to the second day of the first month
  • North Korea 설날: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • Thailand ตรุษจีน: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • Indonesia Tahun Baru Imlek: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • Brunei Tahun Baru Cina: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • Philippines Bagong Taong Tsino: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • Suriname Maan Nieuwjaar: 1 day off, the first day of the first month
  • In addition, Japan is a special case of directly shifting the “traditional festivals” of the lunar calendar to the corresponding dates in the Gregorian calendar to celebrate.
  • “New Year’s Day” in Japan: 6-day holiday, December 29 to January 3

 

image host

 

Mongolia is celebrated according to the Tibetan New Year, which is closer to the lunar calendar, and the festivals in some years will coincide

Mongolia Цагаан сар: 3 days holiday, the first to the third day of the first month of the Tibetan calendar

 

 

However, from another perspective, there is still a big difference between whether this day is a statutory holiday and whether the people celebrate it.

Before 2007, Qingming, Dragon Boat Festival and Mid-Autumn Festival were not statutory holidays in China, which does not mean that people are just like these festivals.

The Lantern Festival, Chongyang Festival, Zhongyuan, Qixi Festival without holidays… If it is not considered a “traditional Chinese festival”, many people will definitely disagree.

So which countries celebrate the Spring Festival? This question is more difficult to talk about, because the scope of celebration of traditional festivals mainly depends on the ethnic group and even the ethnic group, not the country.

Moreover, not every country has a relatively single ethnic composition like North Korea and South Korea, or has a dominant ethnic group with absolute advantage in population and influence like Vietnam.

 

From a national perspective, it includes the following types:

Those who regard the Lunar New Year as a “local traditional festival”: Vietnam, North Korea, South Korea.
Tết in Vietnam and 설날 in North Korea and South Korea are generally regarded as the same-source festivals of the Chinese New Year, not as foreign festivals.

Those who regard the Lunar New Year as the “main ethnic holiday”: Singapore, Malaysia.
The main ethnic groups in Singapore and Malaysia are Malays, Chinese and Indians. The Chinese have a greater influence in the socio-economic and cultural fields, and the Chinese New Year is actually an important national holiday.

Those who regard the Lunar New Year as a “minority festival”: Thailand, Indonesia, Brunei, the Philippines, Suriname.
The proportion of Chinese in these countries is much lower than that of Singapore and Malaysia. They have a high degree of cultural integration with the main ethnic groups in the region, and the celebration of the Spring Festival is relatively small. There is also a tendency to expand). However, the scope mentioned here is relatively small, only compared to the first two types of countries, but it is not limited to self-entertainment in Chinatown like other countries. Especially in cities, the festival atmosphere is still very strong.


Spread the love